Weekly Iteration Topic Requests...!

First of all, I absolutely love weekly iterations!!!

I thought I would request some topics that can benefit junior developers like me. I would love to see in depth of using “curl”, requesting http api calls… and then parsing the data in json format in rails application.

I have been doing a lot of this past few months, and found it hard to get good resources in the web. It would be a great resource for junior developers! :smile:

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@christoomey request here!

Noted! I think this could be a fun one. Thanks for the input @antwonlee.

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I like would an episode on “must read” programming books :smile:

I would also be interested in an episode on the difference between junior vs mid-level or mid-level vs senior developers. You can find information on junior vs. senior (this for example) but it’s hard to find some “benchmarks” for mid-level in my opinion.

EDIT: Actually, reflecting on this over the past few days, I realize this may not have a clean answer but it might be worth talking about…I honestly think we should stop calling people “senior”, “mid”, “junior”, etc. If you think about it, your programming skills are always a work in progress.

I would love a weekly iteration on the implementation and the usage of Clearance

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I would love a Weekly Iteration that covered refactoring RSpec.

I think I’m very strong at DRYing up normal ruby. When I’m trying to consolidate my specs though I still feel very shaky. For example, I’m often uncertain about dealing with RSpec.shared_examples and how changes will work with various lets, subjects, befores, and afters. To make things worse, dropping a binding.pry into my specs in different scopes is often as confusing as it is revealing.

How to include third party gem in your TDD. For example.

“As a user i should be able to sign up”, and you are using DEVISE. How tdd lead you to configure devise.

For the first time I will collaborate with my collegue on a new Rails project. Therefore I would love to see a weekly iteration on the Git-flow used by Thoughtbot.

@acandael Have you seen this episode? https://thoughtbot.com/upcase/videos/git-workflow

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Doh! Does that entitle me to make a new suggestion for the weekly iteration? :blush:

Some topics I’d be interested in:

  • Message queues
  • Realtime push (websockets, ActionCable, etc.)
  • Refactoring complex ‘legacy’ code
  • Load testing
  • Finding causes of slow performance
  • Scaling
  • Advanced posgresql techniques
  • Alternate frameworks such as Lotus.rb
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Here are few:

  • Performance and Scaling
  • Building API
  • React with Rails
  • Using Postgresql features(view, window functions, json, …) in Rails

My whishlist:

  • using FactoryGirl
  • deploying Rails (not Heroku)
  • continuous integration

Topics that I am particularly interested in right now:

  • Setting Up Analytics and Metrics/Gates*
  • Message queues
  • Realtime push (websockets, ActionCable, etc.)
  • Advanced posgresql techniques

All businesses with early and newer software tends to want analytics and metrics/gates. It would be great to see how Thoughtbot goes about structuring and implementing a number of common metrics, especially when they are not stored as records in the db (if you guys do this?). A potential bonus may be to run them thru Segment.io.

A few metrics/gates that I consider common:

  • Session Length
  • Session Interval
  • Active User? (is this based on a last_sign_in… if so, how do you account for remember_me cookies?)
  • User Onboarded (as defined by a single gate or series of items ie: Profile Complete)
  • [Action] taken [x] times counter (Is this just a count of records on a db table? A potential scenario where it would be inefficient and wasteful to have this stored in the db but where you still need a count)
  • Last time [Action] was taken if a record is not stored in the db (is this even possible?)
  • From which page was [Action] taken the most

This likely needs more fleshing out, oftentimes though, I feel as though these business practical “features” are really overlooked in programming-based materials.

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